In keeping with the biomedical perspective, early definitions of health focused on the theme of the body’s ability to function; health was seen as a state of normal function that could be disrupted from time to time by disease.

An example of such a definition of health is: “a state characterized by anatomic, physiologic, and psychological integrity; ability to perform personally valued family, work, and community roles; ability to deal with physical, biological, psychological, and social stress”.

Then in 1948, in a radical departure from previous definitions, the World Health Organization (WHO) proposed a definition that aimed higher: linking health to well-being, in terms of “physical, mental, and social well-being, and not merely the absence of disease and infirmity”.

Although this definition was welcomed by some as being innovative, it was also criticized as being vague, excessively broad and was not construed as measurable. For a long time, it was set aside as an impractical ideal and most discussions of health returned to the practicality of the biomedical model.

Just as there was a shift from viewing disease as a state to thinking of it as a process, the same shift happened in definitions of health. Again, the WHO played a leading role when it fostered the development of the health promotion movement in the 1980s.

This brought in a new conception of health, not as a state, but in dynamic terms of resiliency, in other words, as “a resource for living”. 1984 WHO revised the definition of health defined it as “the extent to which an individual or group is able to realize aspirations and satisfy needs and to change or cope with the environment. Health is a resource for everyday life, not the objective of living; it is a positive concept, emphasizing social and personal resources, as well as physical capacities”.

About the Author

Alex Branning

Alex started the Branning Group in December 2000, when he was only 17 years old. Since then, he has helped thousands of businesses and entrepreneurs and is now widely considered one of the leading high performance marketing coaches in the country. Alex has revolutionized the insurance and real estate marketing sector with his “Giveaway Funnel” strategy, and his trainings have been consumed by entrepreneurs worldwide. Alex’s books include “How to Grow Your Business on Pinterest” and “Insurance Super Agent”. He is followed by tens of thousands of entrepreneurs on Instagram and Facebook, his podcast has been rated as a top business podcast and his YouTube videos have been watched over 200,000 times. He lives in Redding, CA with his wife Kathy, his daughter Ali and their two pets: a brichon frise dog named Snow and a Holland Lop bunny named Foo Foo.

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